Examining the ‘Mother Wound’: Millennial moms healing from generational trauma for the sake of their children
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What is “The Mother Wound”?

One of the most primary, pivotal and inspirational relationships formed is between a mother and a child. As children, we look to our mothers for love, nurture and safety.

In the eyes of a child, our mothers are part of us. It is only over time we grow to see and experience her as an individual. The mother is imperative to our development: a safe space, stability, a home.

The mother wound is a set of unconscious, limiting beliefs that have been passed down to children and internalized through generations. It’s known as generational trauma, a term my generation uses often.

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This Weeks Topic: 🗣 Generational Trauma (The Mother Wound) 💔 (started on previous post about the mother wound) • Acceptance & Acknowledgement. Connecting with our mother wound is not about demonizing or or blaming our parent. Being able to acknowledge those emotions whether it be anger, sadness, grief, disappointment is the first step, but definitely not the entirety of it. Many of us may struggle with guilt or shame around this but in order to heal you must deal with it. We acknowledge to heal not to wound further. In the image above we are just addressing some ways on how your mother wound can manifest in our lives as adults. • 🗣LET TALK ABOUT IT! [Q U E S T I O N] Is generational trauma and/or the mother wound something you connect with? What has been healing in your journey with it? What steps have been the most difficult to take? • We understand this may be a heavy topic to mindfully and candidly discuss, so if you choose not to that is okay but we want you to be mindful of these questions. Journal them, and keep it for yourself to read over and work through. Remember this is your journey and how you move through it is up to you, we are hear to help you get to the root of it. We love you here at MJOM ♥️🥰 . . . #momminandbloggin #mommymeetup #mommyandson #momlife #mommysdayoff #momlifeisthebestlife #generationaltrauma #breastcancerawarenessmonth #majoringinmotherhood #motherhood #motherhoodunplugged #motherhoodrocks #momjeansonme #myhoodismotherhood #mommyandme #mommyblogger #bossmom #sonday #sundayfunday #mommyhustle #lifestyleblogger #parenting #instamom #singlemom #bossmom #mombrand #selfcare #mommyblogger #momblog #momsofinstagram #explorepage

A post shared by By @JanisaCamille 🌻♥️ (@momjeansonme) on

I love that millennial moms are very much or becoming more aware of mental wealth, especially as a mother.

Some of us have been raised by wonderful, loving mothers — with wounded souls. Let me say that again, “Loving mothers — with wounded souls.” Some of us may have had a very different experience with a mother who was distant, consuming, critical or abusive.

However we experienced our mothers as children, we still looked to her for love, safety and stability. We learn, both implicitly and explicitly, how to acquire those needs. Internalizing core beliefs as a form of emotional survival is something we first experience as children, later carrying this inner child with us into adulthood.

The mother wound is not something we need to be ashamed of. It’s a doorway to our power.

Courageous women are stepping forward now to do the necessary work of healing the mother wound, to clear the way for their daughters, sons and most importantly themselves.

Is the mother wound something you connect with? What has been most healing in your journey with the mother wound? What steps have been the most difficult to take?

Share your experience mindfully in the comments below if you feel comfortable and safe doing so.

Janisa Camille is the founder of the interactive wellness community Mom Jeans on Me, which addresses taboo topics of motherhood and wellness.

2 thoughts on “Examining the ‘Mother Wound’: Millennial moms healing from generational trauma for the sake of their children

  1. When I realized I had “mommy issues” I also realized as an adult, going to her for support was not helpful. It was critical, emotionally hurtful and then the family knew my business. I sought out a therapist who explained that as you start to see you parent as an adult, not just your mom, you start to uncover that some of the things you excused as a child are no longer excusable. OR you’re mature enough to stand up to what you always knew was wrong. The relationship has to change so you can feel safe and then… boundaries. It’s a marathon not a race, but it’s necessary. Uncovering decades of hurt and confusion open a lot of wounds and emotions but I know I’m better for me, my child and future family because of it.

    • Yes, it’s imperative for us to view our mothers as human beings. We are human first before we are mothers. We have to learn to accept that sometimes our mothers can’t support us in the way that we would like. There’s definitely room to grow through and bond with one another to be able to at least stand on common grounds with one another. Thank you for reading and responding, I wish the best of luck to you, mama!

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